Lucky 13: This ‘Doctor Who’ fan isn’t ‘scared’ of 13th Doctor’s gender

What a time to be alive.

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Truth be told, I haven’t watched “Doctor Who” in years. Once a rabid “across-the-pond” fan, my attention has waxed and waned over the years before declining sharply with the introduction of Clara as “The Impossible Girl.”

Part of my inattention was caused by the increasingly complex (see: ridiculous) plotlines and escapades imagined by series writer Steven Moffat. The other part was a long waiting period and weakening Netflix addiction that was only revived by my foray into college life. But after yet another wibbly-wobbly timey-wimey tale of hijinks ran off the rails into dramatic explosions and cleverer-than-thou Doctor monologues, I had to stop watching the show or start hating the series that I had loved so much in my late middle school and early high school years.

However, with the release of the new trailer unveiling the 13th incarnation of the alien Doctor grabbing attention across the globe, I’m willing to give this classic British series another chance.

It’s no secret that I’m for more female protagonists. Whether they be in video games, movies, TV shows, books or other mediums, I’m of the belief that more female characters — more complex and engaging female characters with realistic emotional definition and detailed character arcs and plotlines — the better.

[READ: 5 things we need more (or less) of in video games]

So it should be of no surprise that I’m excited about this new Doctor. I do have one critique, however.

What the hell took you so long?

This show has been running continually on British TV since the 1960s — barring a brief break during the 90s until the show’s official relaunch in the early 2000s — with twelve, now thirteen, different incarnations of the title character and countless variations of the spunky sidekick role throughout the years.

ten eight two
Some of the most memorable Doctors include David Tennant (Ten, 2005-2010), Tom Baker (Four, 1974-1981) and Patrick Troughton (Second, 1966-1969) with more great companions than I have room to name in a 800-word blog post. Sources: David-tennant-news.com, Dailymail.com and Pinterest.com

But year after year, Doctor after Doctor, Tardis set after Tardis set, there have been no female Doctors until Jodie Whittaker. And Whittaker has already released a statement urging fans not to be scared of her gender.

You heard right.

Scared. Of her gender.

In a quote in the article “Doctor Who: Fans react to Jodie Whittaker casting” from BBC News, Whittaker said, “I want to tell the fans not to be scared by my gender. This is a really exciting time and Doctor Who represents everything that’s exciting about change.”

The tone of this quote is defensive and a little pleading and while I can sort of understand its necessity , I’m a little shocked and a lot pissed that Whittaker and/or her PR agent felt they had to say it.

But she’s not exactly in the wrong to feel defensive. The BBC article went on to compile some of the most memorable fan reactions to the announcement, rom a father tweeting about his 8-year-old pumping her fist in the air to Facebook and Twitter trolls bemoaning the syntactic difference between a Time Lord and a Time Lady.

yes and no tweets
Seriously, shut up. Just shut up. You have no right to take this moment of victory away from the female Doctor Who fans who are finally celebrating gender parity in regards to the show’s main role. Source: BBC.com

I could go on and on about how the term “doctor” is gender-neutral and about how the show has already shown us through secondary characters and Moffat-y exposition that there are as many Time Ladies as there are Time Lords and about how everyone criticizing the new direction of the show needs to get real about what year we’re living in, but I’m not.

Instead, I’ll just say that this is the kind of world I want to live in. Setting aside the horror-show that is modern politics, at least some in the entertainment industry are trying to do the right thing by factoring gender into equations of Hollywood and small screen success and broadening the traditional role of women in the industry.

[READ: ‘Wonder Woman’ calls for a reimagining of cinematic feminism] 

In a world where women can be Ghostbusters, and superheroes and Jedi and queens and Doctors, those who stand opposite these powerful women and complain about their successes are in the wrong. Those that complain and bemoan the death of traditionally male-dominated roles in the industry are in the wrong. And those that rail against gender parity, that criticize and demean and condemn the female presence as a mark of equality rather than an object of the male gaze are, undoubtedly, unequivocally, unmistakably wrong.

But to all those celebrating the new female Doctor, keep calm and carry on, as those of the BBC would say, and let the power of Lara Croft (and Diana Prince and Rey and the 13th Doctor) be with you.

gender parity