‘Wonder Woman’ calls for a reimagining of cinematic feminism

It’s hard to put into words just how much this movie means to me.

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When it comes to superhero movies, I’ve got pretty low standards.

I know it. My friends know it. My mom knows it. And my sister, the self-proclaimed film critic of our family, knows it and talks about it with me at length, often disparaging my taste in films while she preaches down at me with the great knowledge of YouTube’s Cinema Sins and Screen Rant behind her.

But this long overdue silver screen interpretation of the most enduring female superhero of all time surpassed my standards and even those of my sister. It also surpassed everyone else’s expectations of a female-led superhero movie associated with a superhero brand that just can’t get it right (and with a female director at the helm, no less).

Right out of the gate, the movie made cinematic history, earning over 100 million its opening weekend, according to the Associated Press. Gal Gadot’s “Wonder Woman” also has a 93 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes as of Sunday with close to 250 reviews, higher than any recent DC movie, including “Man of Steel,” “Suicide Squad” and “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice,” and all Marvel films except the first Iron Man, according to Vox.

But it’s not about the money or the ratings or the number of people who gave it a good score on the “Tomatometer.” It’s about what it represents to me and many other female moviegoers sick of watching the same superhero formula film: hope.

beautiful badass diana
I legitimately swooned every time she burst into action. Source: Comicbookmovie.com.

[READ: Why Wonder Woman Should Have Her Own Video Game]

Don’t know what I mean? Think about this for a minute.

Two little girls sat down next to me in the theater. One was blonde and generically cute while the other, her sister, was dark-headed and clumsy, tripping (adorably) on her feet. In her hand she held a Barbie doll with jet-black hair, a familiar red and blue dress and two silver bands clasped around her thin plastic wrists. A tight coil of rope at her hip swayed back and forth as the girl held it, gesturing wildly in her excitement as her dad settled her and her sister down with some popcorn.

Whether or not those girls were old enough to see the movie is not in question here – but if it was, I would probably say they weren’t, as the very first preview was rated “R” and the movie itself featured an amount of violence that befit it’s World War I subject matter. What’s important to them and to other little girls across the country is that for the first time in recent cinematic history, a woman was able to fight and kick butt on screen in a genre of movies generally reserved for men. And what’s more, she wasn’t overly sexualized, much to my relief.

In fact, none of the Amazons were. Their costumes and weapons were appropriate for their Greco-Roman origins and the slow-motion cinematography used during the fight scenes only further highlighted their athleticism and ability, something that is distressingly lacking in other movies depicting female fighters. It seems, to Hollywood, when we aren’t whimpering weaklings, we’re over-sexualized she-demons with about as much venom and malice as a pair of boobs locked behind a tight corset.

[READ: Why ‘Sexy’ Modding Isn’t Really Sexy At All]

WONDER WOMAN
Not overly sexualized, but perfectly athletic and able, Diana and the other Amazonians are the strong women we need from our superhero action movies. Source: Ew.com.

But “Wonder Woman” proved that women can be tough and sexy and intelligent and witty and funny, all without being hyper-sexualized or put on display for the infamous “male gaze.” Not only was Gadot’s portrayal of Diana as funny and charming as it was youthful and emotional, she was a Grade A badass. I fell in love with the way she moved, the confidence in her fighting and her looks and the way she held herself throughout the movie: like someone royal, some awe-inspiring and, well, like someone wonderful.

I fell in love with “Wonder Woman” and with Gal Gadot’s portrayal of the timeless character. It was so important to me that this movie do well and I’m absolutely relieved that it did. Not only because it would have been a death sentence for all other female-led superhero movies, according to the tone of coverage surrounding the movie before it was even released – and that’s an issue for another blog – but because it showed girls, and Hollywood producers, that women are capable of kicking butt and looking hot. Of being sweet and funny while also being tough and heroic.

Of being an icon for a new generation of girls and feminists, ones who deserve a stronger third-wave, or a newly defined fourth, and who deserve to play with Wonder Woman action figures and baby dolls and Barbies and toys that don’t fit into the strict gender binary our consumer culture often forces them into.

It’s hard for me to overstate just how much this movie meant to me, and how much it will mean for a new generation of moviegoers. While it’s easy to say that this movie has finally shattered the impenetrable glass ceiling for women in Hollywood, we can’t get complacent. The same thing was said about movies like “Bridesmaids,” “Thelma and Louise” and “9 to 5,” and here we are, still working towards gender equality in Hollywood and pretty much all other facets of life.

mashup posters
All three of these movies have shattered expectations and cinematic norms, but the glass ceiling has remained firmly intact after each release. Source: Amazon.com and Wikimedia.org.

While I could easily continue to talk about how much I loved this movie and how much more can be done towards making it a truly feminist movie, I think it’s important to remember that these things take time. Yes, “Wonder Woman” is not the magic bullet for female equality in Hollywood some might have wanted it to be, but it can get us there and, if we all work hard enough, we can help it stand for more than just an awesome female superhero movie – which it undeniably is.

We can help it stand representative of a new wave of feminism, or a revisited old one; one that calls attention to the new problems women are facing in our age of social media and technology and one that shakes up the postfeminist narrative that has invaded our media culture.

One last thing. To all those men angry about women-only screenings: Get. Over. It.

Look around a movie theater next time you go to a major action movie like “Fate of the Furious” or “Die Hard” or any Bond movie or the fifth Transformers movie coming out June 21. Those are pretty much all men-only screenings. Besides a brief stint in the silent movie era, almost all of cinematic history has been defined by male movie successes, and even those that flop – “Green Lantern,” “Batman v. Superman” or the Tom Cruise “Mummy” reboot to name a few – are usually given another chance to wow us or, more likely, flop again.

So shut up, sit down, get used to it and let the power of Lara Croft (and Diana of Themyscira) be with you.

Oh and Rocksteady? Don’t think this lets you off the hook. I’m still waiting for a Wonder Woman video game to match your Arkham series.

wonder woman unlocked

 

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